Inside Outside
5
VOLUNTEER

How to start saving the
world

“Just go ahead and do it,” say Kaspersky Lab
employees and set an example of
what and how to do
figures
Kaspersky Lab’s
position
on volunteering

Giving children from underprivileged families blankets and such simple but needed items as, for example, toothbrushes; walking 100 kilometers to support children with developmental challenges or organizing a charity festival on your own — every year hundreds of Kaspersky Lab employees support a wide range of volunteer initiatives. Because they can and want to, and also because even the smallest good deeds can mean the world to someone. Isn’t that a reason to start small and make the greater world better?

For example, getting together a few things
and delivering them
to those in need on your own

It is for the second time that Pranav Bhayani, Kaspersky Lab Mumbai office employee, set off in November 2017 for a car run around remote Indian villages.

He took along five likeminded coworkers and almost half a ton of cargo and headed to the poorest settlements, to the furthest point the road would allow. The Xylo crossover with three rows of seats was filled to the brim with grains, fleece blankets, personal hygiene items, sweets and coloring book for kids. Pranav and his coworkers got up at 6 a.m. in order to slowly drive through 300 km of windy off-roads leading to Hirve and Jambulmatha villages. The locals were not expecting guests, let alone with gifts, and were very glad to receive them. Many of the children had never drawn and didn’t even know where to start.

Hirve has one of the largest local municipal schools. That’s where the team dropped off fleece blankets, a couple of sacks of grains, and personal toiletries. By talking to the director the volunteers found out the school’s needs for future expeditions. And what they need is very simple: a water filter system and some sports equipment.

“In order to bring people at least a little bit of joy, it is not necessary to entertain them — you have to share and help with whatever you can. This was our second charity car run and we are happy with its results. Next time we will optimize our route to save time so that we can manage to do even more,” says Pranav Bhayani.

300 kilometers

of off-roads travelled
by Pranav Bhayani and his coworkers

500

students go to school in the village of Hirve
where the expedition delivered blankets,
toiletries and sweets

«We wanted people around us to believe
in these children and in the fact
that there is nothing impossible
for them either. They just need support»

Anastasiya Marentsova

Kaspersky Lab
Moscow office employee
Climbing a mountain to
help children

Anastasiya Marentsova, a Kaspersky Lab Moscow office employee, participates in all the corporate volunteer initiatives: donates blood, visits the orphanage in Udomlya, and helps handicapped children. And in the fall of 2018, she took part in the Athlete for Good project to support children with Down syndrome.

“Athletes for Good” are people who train for a certain personal athletic record (most commonly a marathon, but could be anything) and decide to dedicate it to “sunny children”. A fundraising page appears on the project’s site and the athlete, besides an athletic goal, sets a financial one for him/herself. Nastia, as her athletic goal, chose to do the Annapurna Circuit Trek in Nepal: a trekking route that takes many days, its highest point being the Thorung La pass with an elevation of 5,416 meters above sea level. It was easy to pick a financial goal: 10 rubles for each meter going up.

From October 19th to November 3rd, Nastia and her friend walked more than 100 kilometers around the Himalayas and collected the necessary amount which will now go to program supporting school children with Down syndrome aged 7-16.

“It was our second trip to Nepal. The year before that, we had walked the trekking route to Everest Base Camp. Back then, nobody believed in us: neither our families, nor our friends or colleagues. Everybody told us we wouldn’t make it: that for two girls without guides and bearers it was impossible. But we managed, and that trip convinced us that there was nothing impossible. That’s why we dedicated our new route to children with Down syndrome: we wanted people around us to believe in these children and in the fact that there is nothing impossible for them either. They just need support.”

Organizing a charity fair,
interesting for both
friends and coworkers alike

Another Kaspersky Lab headquarters employee Yana Valatskaite, together with likeminded associates, has been organizing a charity festival called From Heart to Heart for five years in a row. It is held in Moscow, in Kolomenskoe Park, where more than ten different activity grounds open on this day. They are all charity based: participants can leave in the donation box any amount they find appropriate. At the festival you can learn pottery, gingerbread painting and much more; a handmade crafts fair and concerts are held; you can practice archery, jump in a bumper ball, draw, sculpt, watch science experiments, and try homemade baked goods at the food court. All raised funds go to charities that help children. Each year different organizations are chosen in order to cover more categories of those who need help. For example, the festival collaborates with the Podsolnukh (Sunflower) Foundation that helps children with primary immunodeficiency and autoimmune disorders.

“When you see passionate people that know exactly what line of action to follow and how to grow while helping others, you immediately ask yourself, ‘And what can I do?’” I got interested specifically in social volunteering from the start — projects in which I am still willing to invest efforts, time and, of course, my heart. Volunteering gives me an opportunity to broaden my social circle and my horizons in general. And also to set an example for my six-year-old brother. It is at this age that the most important human qualities are instilled.”

“Volunteering gives me an
opportunity to broaden my
social circle and my
horizons in general”

Yana Valatskaite

Kaspersky Lab Moscow
office employee

How to become a volunteer

What to do if you can’t come up with
a good deed on your own

1
Find
a charity

Surely, there is a cause that touches you more than others: sick children, lonely elderly people, or abandoned animals. Find a charity that helps this cause. The official sites almost always have information about what you can help with specifically.

2
Contact
a volunteer
organization

Volunteer organizations can organize everything for you: not only the volunteer program itself but also help with buying tickets and getting a visa; they will provide accommodation and food. It is not free but all of the organization will be taken care of. On top of that, many programs even provide additional entertainment — from parties to excursions. By the way, there are some state organizations, for example, in the USA there is Peace Corps, in Australia — Australian Volunteers for International Development, in Europe — European Voluntary Service, and worldwide — UN Volunteers.

3
Go through
help exchange
databases

Two most famous databases that connect those who need help with volunteers are called HelpX and Workaway. You can find any opportunities here — from teaching Indonesian children English to assisting a chef in a hotel in Italy. Volunteer work will take up 3-5 hours a day. In return you will be provided with food and board.

4
Write
to event
organizers

You can always directly contact any large-scale event organizers, including charity ones, and ask if they need volunteers. The main thing is to negotiate all the conditions beforehand so that you don’t end up having to do work that will make you miserable.

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Volunteer

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It’s as easy
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homepage
Kaspersky Lab Corporate Social Responsibility Report