Kaspersky Lab’s Position
On Volunteering

Having many employees engaged in social and volunteer projects is a matter of pride for Kaspersky Lab. Our volunteers not only tutor children at the Udomlya Orphanage, but also give blood, participate in charity athletic events, protect the environment, and forge friendships with kids who have survived cancer.

Kaspersky Lab’s Position On Volunteering
 
NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS HAVE RECEIVED ASSISTANCE FROM KASPERSKY LAB
 
VOLUNTEERS WITH KASPERSKY LAB HQ IN MOSCOW, RUSSIA, COLLECTED ONE METRIC TON OF PAPER FOR RECYCLING
 
KL VOLUNTEERS HAVE VISITED UDOMLYA FOUR TIMES IN TWELVE MONTHS
 
KL MOSCOW OFFICE EMPLOYEES HAVE DONATED MORE THAN 90 LITERS OF BLOOD

KL VOLUNTEERS HAVE PARTICIPATED IN CHARITY SPORTS EVENTS: A DANCING MARATHON, A SKI RUN, THREE FOOTBALL CUPS, A VOLLEYBALL TOURNAMENT, A RUN, AND A CYCLING MARATHON







How To Become
a Volunteer
Without Even Noticing

You
Can Do
More

Kaspersky Lab’s Position On Volunteering

If you have no volunteering experience yourself, you may find it hard to understand why someone would be so enthusiastic about doing, for free, work that is not part of their job description. It may be hard to understand how regular people can do some pretty involved and difficult things for others, and one might be excused for thinking that people who do that are somehow special. In fact, you’re just like them, even though you have yet to try volunteering for yourself. But once you decide to do it, you’ll never stop. Three stories about Kaspersky Lab employees who suddenly found themselves part of important volunteering projects provide a good demonstration of how this works.







Helping
the poor

Mumbai-based Kaspersky Lab India employee Sonali Samarai had a meeting with her appartment block neighbors to plan an upcoming New Year’s party. However, as they were discussing various ideas for the party, they decided, instead of organizing a party for themselves, to provide gifts for those who couldn’t afford to celebrate New Year’s Eve — for children from poor families. And they followed through, giving underprivileged kids clothes, toys, and a small amount of money. The appartment association members decided to make it a tradition, organizing similar charity drives on a regular basis. They created a WhatsApp chat group, making Sonali the group’s moderator.

Some 18 months later, the Women’s Club of Twinkle Tower (the name of the appartment block where the club founders live) has expanded its membership to 60. The club keeps coming up with new charity events and drives, setting increasingly ambitious goals, and has been able to help thousands of women and children living on the streets and in shelters.

«The goal of our club now is to show how to expand women’s rights and opportunities in India, where gender discrimination is still rampant and pretty wide-spread,» Sonali says.







Becoming
a “friend” of a school

In the spring of 2015, Leif Jensen, General Manager at Kaspersky Lab Nordic, Denmark, was invited to Borup Skole, a local grade school, to give 7th-8th graders a lecture on how to start your own business.

Discussing startups came as a great surprise to both students and teachers. Grade schoolers were pleasantly surprised by how easy it is to start your own business these days, while their teachers were thrilled by the students’ enthusiasm over the idea. Leif later visited Borup Skole again, this time as the school’s friend. The second time around, he talked about children and online security. Leif decided to continue his private efforts as something of an educator, visiting a kids’ summer camp in July 2016 with another one of his talks.

«Talking with kids about business and innovation, as well as helping them to be better prepared for life after graduation, is not only a lot of fun, but also vitally important, because this is an investment in a better future for all of us,» Leif says, with great confidence.













Teaching kids
how to be independent

Anastasia Marentsova, Internal Events Manager at Kaspersky Lab, organized a visit to a Russian small-town orphanage to bring them toys and household items, and to interact in person with these kids who have to grow up without any parental support. During her orphanage visit, Anastasia discovered that recent orphanage graduates need at least as much help and support as before, as they become prepared for life on their own.

Anastasia and her colleagues were instrumental in establishing a special room at the orphanage simulating a real-world apartment, where future orphanage alumni learn the basics of independent life, including many household chores.

In addition, volunteers organize regular master classes on important aspects of independent life, including management of personal finances, family planning and interaction with government services and agencies.

«Orphanage kids are completely unaware of some things children usually learn from their parents and families. If we want them to grow up as happy and well-adjusted members of society, we simply must support kids who are deprived of parental care and attention,» Anastasia says.

Read more in the Udomlya story